Courses | Department of History & Political Science | Mississippi College
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Undergraduate Courses

All are 3 semester hours unless otherwise noted.

AJU 100 - Introduction to Criminal Justice: An introduction to the fundamental concepts of the criminal justice system.

AJU 200 - Analysis of Drug Abuse: A study of drug abuse and its relationship to the criminal justice system.

AJU 300 - Police Process: An analysis of the role of police in contemporary society.

AJU 301 - Criminal Investigation: A study of the crime solving process.

AJU 310 - Judicial Process: A study of the role and structure of local, state, and federal court systems, including the functions of prosecutors, public defenders, and private lawyer.

AJU 311 - Arrest, Search and Seizure: A study of the constitutional and procedural considerations affecting arrest, search and seizure.

AJU 320 - Corrections Process: A study of the correctional process in contemporary society from conviction to institutionalization.

AJU 321 - Community-Based Corrections: A study of the theories and practices of probation, parole and pardon including administrative organization, feasibility and effectiveness of treating individuals released to the community.

AJU 325 - Legal Research and Bibliography: An introduction to the fundamental and essential tools and resources of legal research. Problems are assigned to give students actual research experience in the Law Library. Primary emphasis is given to the judicial, legislative and administrative sources of American law.

AJU 331 - Forensic Science: A study of crime laboratory principles and scientific crime detection methods.

AJU 332 - Criminology: An analysis of sociological theories of criminology and delinquency with attention to the problems of control and prevention. Cross-listed as SOC 332.

AJU 350 - Critical Thinking and the Law: This course emphasizes the application of critical thinking skills to varied legal problems as a means of determining factual relevance and logical arguments to be used in support of positions taken.

AJU 400* - Police Rights and Responsibilities: A study of the fundamental rights and civil liabilities of the police, their supervisors and other law enforcement personnel.

AJU 401* - Police Personnel Administration: A study of the organization, management techniques, and supervision of police personnel.

AJU 402* - Police Stress: A study of causes, cures and types of stress common to law personnel.

AJU 403* - Criminal Law: A study of the criminal law system which has developed in the U.S., including Mississippi Criminal Statutes.

AJU 405* - Introduction to Loss Prevention: This course is an overview of the field of retail loss prevention and it addresses basic theories and concepts, key terms and definitions and current critical issues. This course introduces the student to the organizational fundamentals of loss prevention, including goals, missions, objectives, functions, operations and roles.

AJU 406* - Executive Management in Loss Prevention: This course introduces the student to retail loss prevention issues from a supervision and management perspective, including the role of loss prevention within the corporate management structure. This course also introduces the student to classic and contemporary management theory along with basic roles and functions of managers and supervisors. This course is designed to assist individuals currently holding or aspiring to management positions in implementing realistic loss prevention strategies in both small and large retail and corporate environments. Lab fees will cover materials for the LPQ exam.

AJU 407* - Private Security Law: This course will introduce the student to the legal aspects and concerns related to Loss Prevention Management and Private Security Administration. It also introduces the student to the applicable criminal procedures utilized in corporate investigations, civil rights and fair employment rules, civil liability, contract considerations and all regulatory agency requirements.

AJU 409* - History of Crime in America: A general study of the history of crimes, criminals, criminal law, law enforcement and punishment in America from the Colonial Age to the present.

AJU 410* - Juvenile Justice Process: A study of the adjudication process for juveniles including the philosophy and practice of treatment procedures for juvenile delinquents.

AJU 421* - Victimology: Analysis of contemporary victim compensation programs and a comprehensive study of victimization.

AJU 425* - Human Relations and Police Work: A course that will enable students to become competent in managing relations between people they might interact within a police department and on their beats. Emphasis is placed on developing oral/written communication and critical thinking skills that will enable students to deal with the various conflicts they might be called on to solve in the daily work routine of a police officer.

AJU 430* - Police Problems and Practices: An analysis of contemporary problems and practices confronting police officers in our society today.

AJU 432* - Special Issues in Criminal Justice: Forum for special course offerings focusing upon special issues in criminal justice by visiting instructors or regular faculty. Some of the Special Issues Courses include the following:

  • Kinesic Interview and Interrogation Techniques
  • Investigating Child Abuse and Neglect
  • Crime Control in America
  • Homicide Investigation
  • Criminal Profiling
  • Organized Crime
  • Juvenile Gangs
  • Private Security Investigation
  • White Collar Crime
  • Identity Theft
  • Hospital Security
  • Campus Security

AJU 434* - Deviant Behavior: A study of social deviance as it relates to such areas in society as crime, delinquency, mental health, and religion.

AJU 441* - Introduction to Homeland Security: This course introduces the student to the field of terrorism and the prevention of terrorism. The prevention of terrorism in the United States lies with the Homeland Security, whether it is federal or state-sponsored. This course explores the history of terrorism and the ongoing battle to keep the world safe from terrorism.

AJU 442* - Introduction to Emergency Management: This course focuses on the areas critical in emergency management and disaster relief systems, to include mitigation, risk management, planning and process. The course covers all issues associated with emergency planning, management, policies and the systems in place to manage disaster support.

AJU 443* - Introduction to Physical Security: This course is designed to familiarize students with the managerial aspects of physical security. This course is an overview of physical security from a management perspective while keeping the student abreast of the industry changes and academic relevance.

AJU 444* - Legal Aspects of Homeland Security: This course is the study of the legal aspects of current government regulations on intelligence operations, identity management, information dissemination, infrastructure protection, security concerns, and ethical issues. The development of public policy in homeland security is examined on local, regional, national and international levels.

AJU 445* - Domestic Terrorism: This course traces the history, emergence, and growth of paramilitary and terrorist groups within the United States. Students will assess various groups' intentions, capabilities, and activities within contexts of and ramifications of political, national security, and legal paradigms.

AJU 446* - International Terrorism: This course examines the global terrorism phenomenon and the social, economic, political, and religious conditions of select states, groups, and individuals that influence the terrorist mindset. Students examine the definitions, origins and development of terror as a means of influencing public policy decisions and in fostering transitions in public power to promote group goals. Specific historical instances of the use of terror are evaluated, assessed, and analyzed. Examples of groups such as the Al-Qaeda terrorist network are assessed including focused discussions on current events.

AJU 447* - Investigating Cyber Terrorism: This course will teach the student to identify the ways that computers can be used by terrorists and criminals. Students completing this course will be able to appraise and assess the potential of different kinds of cyber attacks.The course examines technological advancements on the horizon and the opportunities they may present for terrorists as well as how one can devise plans, countermeasures, and contingencies against future attacks. Students will also learn how to determine the efficacy of current U.S. policy regarding critical infrastructure protection and future avenues for addressing the threat.

AJU 448* - Grant Writing for Homeland Security: This course covers the skills and strategies essential to any grant writing process, but with a heavy emphasis on First Responder grant programs specifically. It will give you the basics you need to apply for funding available from corporate, nonprofit or governmental entities. Specific emphasis is placed on researching and writing grants associated with the Departments of Homeland Security, Justice and those associated with the First Responder community.

AJU 490 - Internship in Criminal Justice (Junior or Senior Standing): A planned program of observation in selected criminal justice agencies representing the major components of the criminal justice system (3 or 6 hours).

AJU 493 Field Studies - A planned program of study with a selected criminal justice agency. ( 3 hours).

AJU 498* - Independent Study in Criminal Justice (Junior or Senior Standing): Surveys and applied research as approved by the director of the Administration of Justice program (1-3-6 hours).

AJU 499* - Directed Readings in Criminal Justice: A readings course designed to broaden knowledge in criminal justice beyond regular course offerings. May be repeated once.

*Denotes that this course may be taken for graduate credit.

Honors Courses

By invitation of the Honors Council

Administration of Justice majors earning credit for Honors I, II, III must take 27 additional hours of Administration of Justice for the major.

AJU 361 - Reading and Research for Honors I (1 hour credit)
AJU 462 - Reading and Research for Honors II (2 hour credit)
AJU 463 - Reading and Research for Honors III (3 hour credit)

Graduate Courses

Prerequisites: Graduate standing with sufficient background in the subject area is a prerequisite for all graduate courses.

Unless otherwise specified all three-semester-hour courses have lecture 3 hours per week. The student is reminded that one-half of all graduate level coursework applied toward a Master's degree must be on the 6000-level.

Graduate courses not offered and taught within a four year period will be automatically dropped from catalog offerings. For compelling reasons, a department may petition the Graduate Council for course retention for an additional 2 years.

*NOTE: A 400-level course taken for undergraduate credit cannot subsequently be changed to graduate credit nor repeated for graduate credit on the 5000-level.

The following have already been described in the Undergraduate Section:

AJU 5400 - Police Rights and Responsibilities

AJU 5401 - Police Personnel Administration

AJU 5402 - Police Stress

AJU 5405 - Introduction to Loss Prevention

AJU 5406 - Executive Management in Loss Prevention 

AJU 5407 - Private Security Law 

AJU 5409 - History of Crime in America 

AJU 5410 - Juvenile Justice Process 

AJU 5421 - Victimology 

AJU 5425 - Human Relations and Police Work 

AJU 5430 - Police Problems and Practices 

AJU 5434 - Deviant Behavior 

AJU 5505 - Seminar in Police Ethics 

AJU 5510 - Seminar in Organized Crime 

AJU 5532 - Special Issues in Criminal Justice 

AJU 5541 - Introduction to Homeland Security 

AJU 5542 - Introduction to Emergency Management 

AJU 5543 - Introduction to Physical Security 

AJU 5544 - Legal Aspects of Homeland Security 

AJU 5593 - Field Studies in Criminal Justice 

AJU 6499 - Directed Readings in Criminal Justice 

AJU 6598 - Independent Study in Criminal Justice 

AJU 6600 - Seminar In American Police Process 

AJU 6610 - Seminar in American Judicial Process 

AJU 6620 - Seminar in American Corrections Process 

AJU 6632 - Special Issues in Criminal Justice, Homeland Security or Loss Prevention/Security Management 

AJU 6645 - Domestic Terrorism 

AJU 6646 - International Terrorism 

AJU 6647 - Investigating Cyber Terrorism 

AJU 6648 - Grant Writing for Homeland Security

AJU 5510 - Seminar in Organized Crime:  A study in the history and methods of organized criminal activity, especially in America. 

AJU 6600 - Seminar in the American Police Process: An intensive study of the police process, including the structure, the participants, and the problems inherent in the American system of policing. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

AJU 6610 - Seminar in the American Criminal Judicial Process: An advanced study of the role of the judiciary in the American Criminal Justice system, including the court structure, procedural rules affecting the criminal process, rules of criminal evidence, and current problems facing the criminal judiciary.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

AJU 6620 - Seminar in the American Corrections Process: A critical examination of the theories, practices, and problems which shape correctional policy in the United States. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

AJU 6632 - Special Issues in Criminal Justice: Forum for special graduate course offerings focusing upon special contemporary issues in Criminal Justice. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

AJU 6645 - Domestic Terrorism: This course traces the history, emergence, and growth of paramilitary and terrorist groups within the United States. Students will assess various groups' intentions, capabilities, and activities within contexts of and ramifications on political, national security, and legal paradigms. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

AJU 6646 - International Terrorism: This course examines the global terrorism phenomenon and the social, economic, political, and religious conditions of select states, groups, and individuals that influence the terrorist mindset. Students examine the definitions, origins and development of terror as a means of influencing public policy decisions and in fostering transitions in public power to promote group goals. Specific historical instances of the use of terror are evaluated, assessed, and analyzed. Examples of groups such as the Al-Qaeda terrorist network are assessed including focused discussions on current events. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

AJU 6647 - Cyberterrorism: This course will teach the student to identify the ways that computers can be used by terrorists and criminals. Students completing this course will be able to appraise and assess the potential of different kinds of cyber attacks.The course examines technological advancements on the horizon and the opportunities they may present for terrorists as well as how one can devise plans, countermeasures, and contingencies against future attacks. Students will also learn how to determine the efficacy of current U.S. policy regarding critical infrastructure protection and future avenues for addressing the threat. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

AJU 6648 - Grant Writing for Homeland Security: This course covers the skills and strategies essential to any grant writing process, but with heavy emphasis on First Responder grant programs specifically. It will give you the basics you need to apply for funding available from corporate, nonprofit or governmental entities. Specific emphasis is placed on researching and writing grants associated with the Departments of Homeland Security, Justice and those associated with the First Responder community. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing