Mississippi College

Beginning in the Spring 2015 semester, The Intensive English Program will be offered as eight week sessions. A full level of IEP may be completed after two eight week sessions.  The fall semester usually lasts from late August to mid-December. The spring semester typically begins mid-January and ends in early May. The summer session usually lasts through June and July.  Check our academic calendar page for exact start dates. 

Intensive English Program classes meet 20 hours per week and are designed to improve and foster the skills related to reading, writing, listening, and speaking. The listening and speaking classes help develop academic listening, academic and conversational speaking, pronunciation, and academic presentations at the student’s appropriate language level. The reading and writing classes help develop academic reading, academic writing, grammar, and research at the student’s appropriate language level. In addition to these 20 hours of class, students will also be required to meet one hour weekly with a conversation partner and one hour weekly with a writing tutor.  There is also an optional 2 hours of test preparation available. 

Students are placed into classes according to their scores on the TOEFL-ITP exam. Students are given this exam upon their arrival at Mississippi College.

Please, see the IEP Handbook for more details regarding IEP placement and exit scores.

Class Listing

Beginner I and II Listening and Speaking

Prerequisite: Students assigned to this course have scored between 310-355 on the TOEFL ITP.

Listening Objectives:  Students will be able to practice simple questions, statements, and face-to-face conversations about topics related to daily life, identify academic style and classroom formalities, recognize the topic of a classroom discussion, identify and use vocabulary related to daily life, lectures, and classroom discussions.

Speaking Objectives:  Students will begin practicing American English pronunciation, ask and respond to simple questions about self, family, and daily life situations (greetings, introducing self, exchanging information, asking for clarification).  During discussion, students will ask for clarification, express agreement or disagreement and other feelings with a topic, describe objects, places, and people accurately. Students will prepare 2-3 minute brief classroom presentations on autobiographical topics and personal interests and follow required presentation format.  Students will use basic grammatical structures learned in class in spoken English.

 

Beginner I and II Reading and Writing

Prerequisite: Students assigned to this course have scored between 310-355 on the TOEFL ITP.

Reading Objectives:  Students will read passages of short lengths with predictable structural patterns and simple vocabulary (biographical information, narrative, simple discourse, personal correspondence), identify the topic and main idea of passages, and answer simple comprehension questions. Students will use simple pre-reading strategies of predicting from textbook pictures and bolded headings.  Students will analyze and formulate opinions about the text and make simple connections between the text and the reader. 

Writing Objectives:  Students will develop writing skills by reviewing the English alphabet.  Students will develop skills in grammar and paragraph structure by constructing complete simple sentences using correct grammatical structures (subject-verb agreement; correct pronoun use; possessives; appropriate verb tenses) and by writing a short paragraph (descriptive, narrative) of at least four sentences with a main idea with varying levels of cohesiveness.  Students will begin to study the form and function of parts of speech.  Students will write simple sentences and compositions based on personal preferences, daily life, and common events and use vocabulary from class topics and common oral discourse.

Research Objectives: Students will become familiar with library resources (online catalog, databases, etc.) and become familiar with APA style format as well as Microsoft Word formatting techniques.

 

Intermediate I and II Listening and Speaking

Prerequisite: Students assigned to this course have scored between 356-403 on the TOEFL ITP.  

Listening Objectives: Students will understand simple questions, statements, and face-to-face conversations about topics related to daily life, identify topics and main points of an academic lecture, demonstrate understanding of the topic and main points through note-taking and answering comprehension questions, and recognize the topic of a classroom discussion.  Students will identify and use vocabulary related to daily life, lectures, and classroom discussions.

Speaking Objectives: Students will begin practicing American English pronunciation, ask and respond to simple questions about self, family, and daily life situations, express meaning through short statements which are generally limited to predictable exchanges necessary for daily life.  During discussion, students will ask for clarification, give short and simple responses that contribute to the discussion, express agreement or disagreement with a topic. Students will prepare 3-5 minute brief classroom presentations on autobiographical topics and personal interests and follow required presentation format.  Students will develop and use basic grammatical structures learned in class in spoken English.

 

Intermediate I and II Reading and Writing

Prerequisite: Students assigned to this course have scored between 356-403 on the TOEFL ITP.   

Reading Objectives:  Students will improve reading comprehension by reading and demonstrating understanding of basic biographical information, narrative, simple discourse, personal correspondence, and simple news articles. Students will identify the topic and main idea of passages and answer basic comprehension questions. Students will practice pre-reading strategies such as inferring from visual cues, skimming, and making predictions. Students will begin to identify the purpose of a text: to inform, to persuade, etc.  Students will analyze readings and formulate opinions about the text and make simple connections between the text and the reader.

Writing Objectives: Students will demonstrate their understanding of the writing process by using prewriting strategies such as creating an outline, writing a draft from an outline or plan and applying revision, editing, and proofreading.  Students will demonstrate understanding of grammar and paragraph structure by constructing complete sentences, using correct grammatical structures and by writing a paragraph with a main idea with varying levels of cohesiveness.  Students will begin to understand the form and function of parts of speech.  Students will write simple sentences and compositions based on personal preferences, daily life, and common events and use vocabulary from class topics and common oral discourse.

Research Objectives:  Students will understand the definition and purpose of academic research by demonstrating their ability to summarize, paraphrase, and quote information from a text.  Students will become familiar with library resources (online catalog, databases, etc.) and use a library source (simple book, news article, etc.) to write 1-3 paragraphs about a pre-selected topic.  

 

Advanced I and II Listening and Speaking

Prerequisite: Students assigned to this course have scored between 404-416 on the TOEFL ITP.  

Listening Objectives:  Students will follow general flow of face-to-face conversations and understand conversations about general social topics.   Students will demonstrate lecture comprehension by identifying topics, main points, and some details of an academic lecture.  Students will demonstrate understanding of the topic, main points, and details through note-taking and comprehension questions and by summarizing the topic, main points, and details. Students will identify and use vocabulary related to general social topics, lectures, and classroom discussions.

Speaking Objectives:  Students will reduce accent through pronunciation practice by practicing the appropriate enunciation of syllables and words.  During conversation, students will actively participate in a variety of conversations about social and academic topics and will express meaning through detailed and connected responses. During classroom discussion, students will agree or disagree with a topic by expressing opinions and providing examples, actively participate in classroom discussions with detailed responses, paraphrase student responses and lecture material.  Students will prepare and deliver 10-15 minute classroom presentations which demonstrate growth in clarity, vocabulary, and cohesiveness.  Students will use standard presentation structure (introduction, body, and conclusion) and use presentation software.  Students will practice grammar structures learned in class in spoken English and identify problematic grammar and make corrections.

 

Advanced I and II Reading and Writing

Prerequisite: Students assigned to this course have scored between 404-416 on the TOEFL ITP.  

Reading Objectives:  Students will read and demonstrate comprehension of passages of varying lengths and purposes with increasing complexity in vocabulary. Students will read and understand textbook passages, news and academic articles, fiction and nonfiction, formal and informal texts; identify the topic, main idea, and details of a passage; and summarize the passage and answer basic comprehension questions.  Students will practice reading strategies by using pre-reading strategies such as inferring from visual cues, skimming, and making predictions; and using context clues to understand unknown vocabulary within a text; and by identifying the purpose of the text (to inform, to persuade, etc.), the author’s point of view, and the intended audience.  Students will analyze and formulate opinions and judgments, draw conclusions, and make inferences about the text and apply themes from the text to current issues.

Writing Objectives:  Students will demonstrate understanding of the writing process by planning and creating cohesive essays with increasing ability to include all components of an essay: introduction, body, conclusion. Students will connect ideas using transitional words and phrases, apply grammatical concepts learned in class to writing assignments, and apply the form and function of parts of speech. Students will identify and correct grammatical errors.  The content of students’ writings will begin to demonstrate their ability to write paragraph and essay length compositions in a variety of styles such as: informative, narrative, argumentative, opinion, and compare and contrast. Students will write paragraph and essay length compositions about current events, personal preferences, and topics related to specific fields of study and textbook readings. Students will use vocabulary from class topics appropriate for academic writing and increase fluency and competence through informal in-class compositions about a variety of topics. 

Research Objectives:  Students will understand the definition and purpose of academic research by following the research process.  Students will demonstrate understanding of research skills: summary, paraphrase, and quotation, find and evaluate sources that would be useful for their topic, use library resources. (online catalog, databases, etc.), identify differences between sources (popular vs. scholarly, edited vs. unedited, etc.), and take content notes.  Students will incorporate source material into writing by using appropriate citation style (APA) and synthesizing information from sources into coherent ideas.  Students will use the research process to complete an introductory level research essay of 2-4 pages with pre-selected topics and sources, draft a thesis statement, create an outline, write a draft of the assignment, and use the writing process for editing and revision.   

Advanced-High I and II Listening and Speaking

Prerequisite:  Students assigned to this course have scored between 417-546 on the TOEFL ITP.  

Listening Objectives:  During conversation, students will follow general flow of face-to-face conversations understand conversations about a wide variety of social and academic topics which can extend to specialized fields and particular interests. During lectures, students will identify topic, main points, and details of an academic lecture, demonstrate understanding of the topic, main points, and details through note-taking and comprehension questions, summarize topic, main points, and details, and make judgments about the information.  During classroom discussion, students will follow general flow of classroom discussion, and comprehend classroom discussion while making inferences. Students will identify and use vocabulary related to a wide variety of social and academic topics.

Speaking Objectives:  Students will effectively produce all sounds of American English phonetics through pronunciation practice to create more native-like speech.  During conversation, students will participate extensively in a wide variety of social and academic conversations which can extend to specialized fields and particular interests, express meaning through extended oral discourse, and use formal and informal language in appropriate settings.n During classroom discussion, students will actively participate in discussions by expressing opinions and elaborating on classroom topics, clarify ideas and opinions in classroom discussions, and collaborate with other students to keep the discussion on topic and work toward a consensus.  Students will participate in formal presentations which demonstrate clarity, advanced vocabulary, and cohesiveness; use standard presentation structure: introduction, body, and conclusion; and use presentation software.  Students will use grammar structures learned in class in spoken English and identify problematic grammar and make corrections.

 

Advanced-High I and II Reading and Writing

Prerequisite: Students assigned to this course have scored between 417-546 on the TOEFL ITP.

Reading Objectives: Students will read and demonstrate comprehension of academic passages, news and academic journal articles, and longer works of fiction and nonfiction, identify the topic, main idea, and details of a passage, summarize the passage and answer comprehension questions including increasingly complex short answer and discussion questions.  Students will use reading strategies by using pre-reading strategies such as inferring from visual cues, skimming, and making predictions; using context clues to understand unknown vocabulary within a text; and identifying the purpose of the text (to inform, to persuade, etc.), the author’s point of view, and the intended audience.  Students will analyze and formulate opinions and judgments, draw conclusions, and make inferences about the text; engage the text by defending personal opinions and judgments in a group discussion; apply themes from the text to current issues; and compare and contrast the text with other works of literature which have similar themes.

Writing Objectives:  Students will demonstrate understanding of the writing process by planning and creating cohesive essays with increasing ability to include all components of an essay: introduction, body, conclusion; writing cohesive essays with a clear thesis, main points that support the thesis, and a logical conclusion; connecting ideas using transitional words and phrases; applying grammatical concepts learned in class to writing assignments; and identifying and correcting grammatical errors.  The content of students’ writings will demonstrate their ability to write paragraph and essay length compositions in a variety of styles such as: informative, narrative, argumentative, opinion, and compare and contrast. Students will write paragraph and essay length compositions about most common topics and topics related to specific fields of study and textbook readings. Students will use vocabulary from class topics appropriate for academic writing and increase fluency and competence through informal in-class compositions about a variety of topics.

Research Objectives:  Students will understand the definition and purpose of academic research by following the research process.  Students will demonstrate understanding of research skills: summary, paraphrase, and quotation; gather and evaluate sources; use library resources (online catalog, databases, etc.); identify differences between sources (popular vs. scholarly, edited vs. unedited, etc.); and take content notes.  Students will incorporate source material into writing by using appropriate citation style (APA) and synthesizing information from sources into coherent ideas.  Students will use the research process to complete a 5-7 page research project, draft a thesis statement, create an outline, write a draft of the assignment, and use the writing process for editing and revision. 

 

Discover America 

This course is a part of the Listening and Speaking class.  It will introduce students to various aspects of American culture in order to develop awareness and understanding. Students will also study communication skills related to long-term assignments, group work, and presentation skills.  The Beginner, Intermediate, and Advanced level students will participate in short-term projects while the Advanced-High level students will participate in a group extended presentation.

Test Preparation

This course is a part of both the Reading and Writing and Listening and Speaking classes for a total of two hours per week.  The students meet together for one hour each week to study listening and speaking skills and one hour each week to study reading and writing skills related to either the TOEFL or IELTS exam

Movie Class (for Beginner Students Only)

Due to the limited English proficiency of our beginner students, this course uses the visual aid and context of popular American movies to develop the students’ conversational English vocabulary, strengthen their listening and observation skills, as well as, their understanding of American popular culture.  Discussion questions will be given with each movie and students will be encouraged to think about and discuss the themes, ideas, and opinions that are portrayed in the movie.

Novel Class (for Intermediate Students Only)

This course is designed to increase the intermediate students’ reading comprehension and analytical thinking through the close reading of a popular American novel.   Also through the close reading of the novel, students will further expand their English vocabulary as well as implicitly pick up English grammatical structures. In addition, students will also be given many opportunities to comprehensively discuss American cultural values and popular motifs.

English for Academic Purposes (for Advanced and Advanced-High Students Only)

Because Advanced and Advanced-High students will more than likely be moving onto academic classes following this semester, this course has been designed to further prepare them for the Academic English they will face in their individual majors.  Students will study Latin roots, prefixes, and suffixes in order to have the tools necessary to decipher new vocabulary they encounter in their academic classes.  Students will also be taught reading strategies they will be able to employ when reading the often dense academic material required in their American university classes.  In addition to these linguistic objectives, students will also be taught analytical thinking and idea development through various cooperative learning activities (including a service learning project coordinated with local area high schools).

Language Lab

The Intensive English Program's language lab consists of 15 individual carols in which students can watch cultural videos, listen to English dialogue for comprehension, or record themselves to aid in pronunciation correction and development. The language lab also has a large-screen television equipped with DVD player and computer set up. Students use this to watch cultural movies together and to give multi-media presentations to large groups. In addition to this computer set up, the language lab is outfitted with wireless internet, so students may bring their own personal computers and use the internet to complete class assignments.

IEP Teachers

All Intensive English Program teachers are college graduates with either a post-collegiate certificate in teaching English as a Second Language or a Master's Degree in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL).

Request Information

Interested in attending Mississippi College? Fill out the form below and we’ll connect you with an admissions specialist to assist you in the admissions process.

Program of interest: