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Business Students at Mississippi College Support Baptist Global Response


Mississippi College School of Business Dean Marcelo Eduardo, accounting professor Billy Morehead and professor John Brandon, leader of MC's entrepreneurship program, join business students at Self Hall in early December. Students from six MC School of Business organizations raised more than $3,000 for Baptist Global Response initiatives. Led by Morehead, the Accounting Society collected the most money.

Baptist Global Response leaders are focused on helping a hurting world.

Families going hungry, poverty-stricken people drinking dirty water and farmers needing better techniques to raise better crops or livestock are causes they support. At the same time, they seek to spread the message of Jesus.

In recent weeks, about 100 Mississippi College business students joined forces to aid Baptist Global Response efforts.

This Fall, MC students associated with a half-dozen business organizations on the Clinton campus raised more than $3,000 to assist the organization.

Poor communities in Central America, South America and Africa will reap the benefits of the MC donations. Southern Baptist leaders from all walks of life serve on the group’s nine-member board of directors.

School of Business Dean Marcelo Eduardo joined professors in Self Hall applauding the students for their spirited efforts to make the initiative a success.

“Our aim is to prepare highly successful business graduates that have the utmost integrity and a great sense of service to others,” Eduardo said. “This project exemplifies that sense of service and the desire to help others.”

The MC School of Business groups teaming up included the accounting society, women in business, the American Marketing Association, and the entrepreneurship club. The investment club and service club rounded out the student groups lending a hand.

Members of School of Business organizations set up tables in the school cafeteria and held activities at Alumni Hall to raise dollars, said senior Reid Allen of Birmingham, Alabama.

It was the first year the business students worked together on the Baptist Global Response’s bio-farm project.

The drive helps to make more families around the globe become sustainable, added MC senior Chris Thomason of Birmingham.

“The accounting society won the challenge of raising the most funds,” Eduardo said. “But it was a group effort.”

Faculty members, he said, “are so proud of our students.”

In 2017, Baptist Global Response efforts helped 937,386 people around the world. The BGR projects impacted 3,058 communities.

Baptist Global Response officials estimate the cost of a donation of $60 per month will help a family build a new life following a disaster.